Teaching a Mountain Lion to Roar in Spanish !

BILINGUAL CONFIGURATION

APPLE OPERATING SYSTEM

Mac OS X  v10.8.3

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Let’s Rock it !

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Feeding some “Soft” Office Skills [ Why not ! ]

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Easy Cat, your Second Thong arrives in…..!

OS X is based upon the Mach kernel. Certain parts from FreeBSD’s and NetBSD’s implementation of Unix were incorporated in NeXTSTEP, the core of Mac OS X. NeXTSTEP was the graphical, object-oriented, and UNIX-based operating system developed by Steve Jobs’ company NeXT after he left Apple in 1985.[15] While Jobs was away from Apple, Apple tried to create a “next-generation” OS through the Taligent, Copland and Gershwin projects, with little success.[16]

Eventually, NeXT’s OS, then called OPENSTEP, was selected to be the basis for Apple’s next OS, and Apple purchased NeXT outright.[17] Steve Jobs returned to Apple as interim CEO, and later became CEO, shepherding the transformation of the programmer-friendly OPENSTEP into a system that would be adopted by Apple’s primary market of home users and creative professionals. The project was first known as Rhapsody and was later renamed to Mac OS X.[18]

Mac OS X Server 1.x, was incompatible with software designed for the original Mac OS and had no support for Apple’s own IEEE 1394 (FireWire) interface. Mac OS X 10.x included more backward compatibility through Classic and more functionality by introducing the Carbon API as well as FireWire support. As the operating system evolved, it moved away from the legacy Mac OS to an emphasis on new “digital lifestyle” applications such as the iLife suite, enhanced business applications (iWork), and integrated home entertainment (the Front Row media center).[19] Each version also included modifications to the general interface, such as the brushed metal appearance added in version 10.3, the non-pinstriped titlebar appearance in version 10.4, and in 10.5 the removal of the previous brushed metal styles in favor of the “Unified” gradient window style.[20][21]

In 2012, with the release of OS X 10.8, the “Mac” prefix was officially dropped in all references to the operating system name within its web site.[22]

ABOUT THIS CAT:

OS X Mountain Lion

OS X Mountain Lion (version 10.8) is the ninth major release of OS X (formerly Mac OS X), Apple Inc.’s desktop and server operating system for Macintosh computers. OS X Mountain Lion was released on July 25, 2012 for purchase and download through Apple’s Mac App Store, as part of a switch to releasing OS X versions online and every year.[1] Named to signify its status as a refinement of the previous OS X version, Lion,[citation needed] Apple’s stated aims in developing Mountain Lion were to allow users to more easily manage and synchronise content between multiple Apple devices and to make the operating system more familiar[2] to users of Apple’s more popular mobile operating system, iOS.

The operating system gained the new malware-blocking system Gatekeeper and integration with Apple’s online Game Center and iCloud services, while the Safari web browser was updated to version 6. As on iOS, Notes and Reminders became full applications, separate from Mail and Calendar, while the OS X iChat application was replaced with a version of iOS’s Messages. Mountain Lion also added a version of iOS’s Notification Center, which groups updates from different applications in one place. Integrated links allowing the user to rapidly transfer content to Twitter were present in the operating system from launch. Facebook integration was also planned but unfinished at launch date,[3] and released as a downloadable update later.

OS X Mountain Lion received positive reviews, with critics praising Notification Center, Messages, and speed improvements[4] over Mac OS X Lion, while criticizing iCloud for unreliability[5][6] and Game Center for lack of games. Mountain Lion sold three million units in the first four days, and selling 28 million units as of June 10, 2013; making it Apple’s most successful Mac OS.

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